New on ROK: Importance of Strength Training

To say that “strength training is important” sounds pretty obvious, doesn’t it? Nonetheless, it needs to be said to convey just how important it is. My new article on Return of Kings is about why this type of training is of the utmost necessity, especially (but not only) for us men.

…I have discussed that there’s more to life than strength training—and I will never stop standing by that. Contrary to what some in the manosphere would have you believe, to solely do resistance training is only giving yourself a half-advantage; after all, a man who can deadlift 1000 pounds isn’t all that useful if he can’t walk up a flight of stairs without dying of a heart attack.

With that being said, I wish to make something perfectly clear: while I don’t feel that strength training is the only thing you should do, I do feel that it is the most important thing you ought to be doing. To put quantities upon it, I would roughly estimate that 50% of the state of being “fit” is being strong, with the remaining 50% being a combination of cardiovascular and flexibility/dexterity training.

Simply put, if you’re not strength training, you are not training yourself to be as fit and strong as you can possibly be.

Obviously, the most visible benefit in strength training is that, simply, you will see increased strength and ability—which is to say, the ability to produce and resist external forces. It’s pretty self-explanatory: both the actual muscles fibers will increase in strength, and the central nervous system will become more accustomed to firing muscle units in synchronicity. Or to put it in even simpler terms—if you train with progressively heavier weights, you will become stronger…

You can click right here, to go to Return of Kings and read this article.

  • Fürchtegott

    I know this will sound nuts at first.
    But look into Plankalkül.
    ” I would roughly estimate that 50% of the state of being “fit” is being strong, with the remaining 50% being a combination of cardiovascular and flexibility/dexterity training.”
    The amazing similarity is, Plankalkül knew only (for a good reason) three expression calls which were restricted. Performance specific restricted.

    • Fürchtegott

      pS. And as a great example, didn’t Wernher Freiherr von Braun look like a god among men? 😉

    • I’m not entirely sure how programming has anything to do with this, but thanks for reading.

      • Fürchtegott

        Because it isn’t the typical infinite two dimensional programming logic we use today.
        Germans had analog computers. And Zuse, in simple terms, tried to put the analog into Lochkartenlogik.
        Computers today have a pure binary logic, one for thumb suckers, for babies.
        Which is at least interesting, because a transistor isn’t really power on or power off, but enough voltage or not enough voltage for the logic gate.
        Well, we were the last high culture in the west, the rest is just culture.