How to: Hook and Uppercut.

Completing the set of basic punches, the hook and uppercut are short-range punches that are thrown with hip and shoulder whirl.

Hook: 

Stand in the standard stance, whirl the hips, put the arms horizontal, keep the elbow bent, land and follow through, clench up, etc.  Look at where you’re throwing, but don’t lean forward in the punch like you do with the straight, it prevents you from getting a proper hip whirl. Land on the same knuckles as usual. You can throw these with either vertical or horizontal fists.

Hooks to the face are blocked with the vertical forearm: preferably by putting your arm in the crook of their elbow and stopping the fist before it reaches your face. If not, put your arm in front of the fist. Hooks to the body are blocked similarly to straight punches to the body: rotate your torso in a way that puts your elbow in the way of the opponent’s fist. As usual, the rule of opposites applies-the right arm blocks left hooks, and the left arm blocks a right hook.

Uppercut:

Put your arm in whatever position you want to hit (ie: the hitman for bodypunches, and one of the standard positions for face punches). Then you rotate the body similarly to the straight punch, and sort of “stab” the fist into the body, or up and under the chin. You aim with the third and fourth knuckles as usual, and rotate the fist so that the palm points up. Snap the fist as you did before.

Uppercuts to the face are blocked with a horizontally held forearm, preferably by putting the arm in the crook of their elbow. Uppercuts to the body can be blocked the same way, or by the same method that is used to block straight body punches-moving the torso to position the elbows in the way of the punch. The rule of opposites applies here (right blocks left, left blocks right).

Now that we have done all the basic punches, let me reiterate the core principle of striking: proper punches are always thrown by thrusting the hips, waist,  and/or shoulders forward, and launching the fist towards the opponent, rather than cocking the fist and throwing the arm at the opponent.